Sebastián Deyá Gallery

fine art paintings

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  • An architectural CAPRICCIO with a mythological scene, atrib to Viviano Codazzi.

An architectural CAPRICCIO with a mythological scene, atrib to Viviano Codazzi.

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An architectural CAPRICCIO with a mythological scene, atrib to Viviano Codazzi.

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An architectural Capriccio with figures

165x205cm

Oil on original canvas

This painting is particularly similar to those painted by Viviano Codazzi (circa 1603-1670), who was originally from Bergamo but active in Rome towards the end of the 1640s, and who specialised in architectural perspectives. Unlike the heroic landscapes of contemporary artists from Emilia-Romagna and France, Codazzi’s work shows a constant search for verisimilitude, even in the case of invented images, and a use of light intended to inspect even the humblest of details. The details found in this painting, such as the Doric columns, the colours of the buildings in the background and the sculptures on the building, are also seen in his work.

Elements from other compositions can be identified in the numerous figures animating the scene. 

He had moved by 1633 to Naples where he worked on commissions at the Certosa di San Martino resulting from his connections with his fellow Bergamasque Cosimo Fanzago. A major commission in Naples was a series of four large canvases representing ancient Roman scenes (including one depicting gladiatorial combats in the Colosseum) for the Buen Retiro in Madrid, with figures by Domenico Gargiulo. Codazzi was a painter of architecture and the figures in his compositions were always painted in by specialist figure painters. In Naples his principal collaborator for the figures was Gargiulo. 

The present painting depicts an imaginary architectural composition dominated by an imposing building to the right, raised on top of steps, surrounded by Doric columns and surmounted by beautiful figures. The numerous details, such as the relief above the capitals and the classic statues holding arms, are of great interest. The canvas is part of the seventeenth-century Roman landscape movement, which also included artists such as Viviano Codazzi, Michelangelo Cerquozzi, Filippo Lauri and Vicente Giner. This genre was partly inspired by the work of Dutch artists active in Rome around the mid-seventeenth century known as Bamboccianti and led by Peter Van Laer. The Bamboccianti in turn influenced the landscape movement, which was formed in Venice during the following century.

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An architectural Capriccio with figures

165x205cm

Oil on original canvas

This painting is particularly similar to those painted by Viviano Codazzi (circa 1603-1670), who was originally from Bergamo but active in Rome towards the end of the 1640s, and who specialised in architectural perspectives. Unlike the heroic landscapes of contemporary artists from Emilia-Romagna and France, Codazzi’s work shows a constant search for verisimilitude, even in the case of invented images, and a use of light intended to inspect even the humblest of details. The details found in this painting, such as the Doric columns, the colours of the buildings in the background and the sculptures on the building, are also seen in his work.

Elements from other compositions can be identified in the numerous figures animating the scene. 

He had moved by 1633 to Naples where he worked on commissions at the Certosa di San Martino resulting from his connections with his fellow Bergamasque Cosimo Fanzago. A major commission in Naples was a series of four large canvases representing ancient Roman scenes (including one depicting gladiatorial combats in the Colosseum) for the Buen Retiro in Madrid, with figures by Domenico Gargiulo. Codazzi was a painter of architecture and the figures in his compositions were always painted in by specialist figure painters. In Naples his principal collaborator for the figures was Gargiulo. 

The present painting depicts an imaginary architectural composition dominated by an imposing building to the right, raised on top of steps, surrounded by Doric columns and surmounted by beautiful figures. The numerous details, such as the relief above the capitals and the classic statues holding arms, are of great interest. The canvas is part of the seventeenth-century Roman landscape movement, which also included artists such as Viviano Codazzi, Michelangelo Cerquozzi, Filippo Lauri and Vicente Giner. This genre was partly inspired by the work of Dutch artists active in Rome around the mid-seventeenth century known as Bamboccianti and led by Peter Van Laer. The Bamboccianti in turn influenced the landscape movement, which was formed in Venice during the following century.